News Journal

Wednesday, April 8, 2020 • USPS 387-780 • ourvalley.org • 75 cents Radford education programs featured in VSBA Showcases for Success directory Radford City Public Schools has been recognized in the Virginia School Boards Association’s (VSBA) 24th annual VSBA Showcases for Success directory, which highlights successful K-12 programs in Vir- ginia’s public schools. The focus of the 2020 VSBA Showcases for Success is “The Pro- file of a Virginia Graduate, high- lighting unique program offerings in Virginia’s public schools,” ac- cording to the VSBA. “In addition to highlighting some of the best practices taking place in Virginia’s schools, the VSBA Show- cases for Success directory can serve as a starting point to develop similar programs in other school divisions,” said Gina G. Patterson, VSBA’s ex- ecutive director. The first Radford program rec- ognized is the Career and Etiquette Luncheon, held with eighth graders each year. “Our Career and Etiquette Lun- cheon educates eighth-grade stu- dents on communication skills, dressing for success and etiquette,” said Suzanne Saunders, the counsel- or at Dalton Intermediate School. “An etiquette lesson is taught prior to our luncheon providing students with communication tips, proper manners and etiquette and what dressing for success means. “Lunch is upscaled with silverware, table- cloths and place setting. Those in attendance are served,” Saunders said. “We partner with Radford’s Noon Rotary Club, which provides area business men and women to join us during our luncheon. These professionals help carry on con- versation at the tables, share about their careers and model etiquette to PHOTOS BY HEATHER BELL Two Radford programs were recognized by the Virginia School Boards Association’s (VSBA) 24th annual VSBA Showcases for Success directory, which highlights successful K-12 programs in Virginia’s public schools, including the Career and Etiquette Luncheon, held with eighth graders each year and pictured here. Two county employees test positive for COVID-19; government center closed Late Friday afternoon, two Montgomery County employees tested positive for COVID-19. As a result and out of an abundance of caution, the Montgom- ery County Government Center is closed to both citizens and employees for two weeks. While the Montgom- ery County Government Center is shut down, the following local govern- ment functions will con- tinue: emergency services and public safety; opera- tions at the Montgom- ery County Courthouse (some restrictions apply); solid waste convenience sites and disposal; water and sewer services; and animal control response for bite cases, incidents involving seriously in- jured animals, or official requests for services made by public safety officials in response to emergency incidents. For questions about specific local government operations during this time, visit www.montva. com/status. Residents are reminded to continue to do their part to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 by washing your hands with soap and water or use hand sanitizer, keeping household surfaces clean (including cell phones), coughing or sneezing into a tissue (and discard it) or your elbow, avoiding touching your face, prac- ticing “social distancing,” avoiding shaking hands, remaining at home if you’re sick, and avoiding others who are sick. Residents who feel ill should not go to an emer- gency room but should call their health care pro- vider or the local health department. The New River Health District has activated a lo- cal public health hotline at 540-267-8240, Mon- day through Friday from 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. – noon; Sunday, noon – 4 p.m. The Virginia Depart- ment of Health (VDH) also has a public health hotline at 877-ASK- VDH3, available week- days from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 19,000 people don’t lie: Here are the absolute worst and best candies, ranked, for Easter 2020 Easter is a really big candy holiday. Did you know more is spent on candy for Easter historically than for Halloween itself? Depending on which data you look at, Easter is as big or big- ger than even Halloween. It’s a silent monster. Easter Candy Quick Facts Among those who celebrate Easter, 87% of plan on buying Easter candy. For those who don’t celebrate Easter, 33% plan on buying Easter candy. People will spend about $21 on av- erage. Total Easter spending is estimated to be over $18B in 2019. Ninety million chocolate Easter bunnies are made each year. 87% of parents will prepare Easter baskets for their kids. 81% of them will steal some candy from their kids’ baskets. The National Retail Federation says Easter candy spending was $2.49 bil- lion in 2019, down slightly from2018’s $2.63B. In 2020, it is a little murky due to the coronavirus outbreak. So stock up for your Easter egg hunt while you still can. Historically, however, of the people who do not plan to celebrate Easter, 33% will still buy Easter candy. What? That says a lot. There is some good stuff out there, people. But there is also some pretty bad stuff. Candystore.com knows for sure because you’ve told us loud and clear what you don’t like. You have to be careful when asking people about their least favorite holiday candy. It stirs up some deep emotions that can come out in an unfiltered rage. There’s a lot not to like about the way 2020 is shaping up. Easter is Sun- day, April 12, and the candy opinions are out. You’ve heard the complaints and even had some of these in your own Easter basket. Candystore.com asked a whole lot of people about their favorite and least favorite Easter candy. They got 19,000 responses. So the truth can finally be revealed: HERE ARE THE TEN WORST EASTER CANDIES: #10. Fluffy Stuff cotton candy stayed at #10 this year. It is a popular brand of packaged cotton candy. If you like cotton candy, it’s good cotton candy. The people in our survey made it clear, though, that cotton candy is not their favorite, to put it mildly. More than that though, there is a strong sentiment that it doesn’t be- long in the family of Easter appropriate candies. It does feel a little gimmicky to take a cotton candy product and call it a rabbit’s tail and market it for Easter. That may not be terribly different from what a lot of candy products do, but it does feel a little forced here. #9. Jelly Beans (generic) are down from #6 last year. Jelly beans come in many differ- ent flavors from many, many different manufacturers.They are not universally hated for Easter. It’s just that people prefer higher quality jelly beans these days. The days where you could plop any old jelly bean down into the grassy Eas- ter basket might be gone. #8. Peeps Hot Tamales. New on the list this year. The thing with Peeps is there is a group of people who love them and a much louder group who do not. Peeps are fun for making funny art stuff, but See Easter Candy , page 3 Clair Robins Clair@candystore.com Radford City first responders now wearing masks Radford City first responders are taking precautionary measures in an effort to prevent the spread of CO- VID-19 (coronavirus). Police, fire and rescue personnel have been encouraged to wear masks or face coverings when responding to calls and interacting with the public. This change will not affect how public safety personnel operate. Both the police department and fire and EMS agencies in Radford will contin- ue to respond to calls, but this added precaution will help ensure the safety of the first responders and the public. Please continue to do your part to help prevent the spread of CO- VID-19 by: • washing your hands with soap and water or use hand sanitizer, • keeping household surfaces clean (including cell phones), • coughing or sneezing into a tis- sue (and discard it) or your elbow, • avoiding touching your face, • practicing “social distancing,” • avoiding shaking hands, • remaining at home if you’re sick, • avoiding others who are sick, and • staying home except in extremely limited circumstances Should you think you are experi- encing symptoms of coronavirus: (Symptoms of coronavirus - http:// www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019- ncov/about/symptoms.html) • CALL your health care provider or your local health department (do not go to the emergency room). • The New River Health District has activated a local public health hotline at 540-267-8240, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. - 8 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. – noon; Sunday, noon – 4 p.m. • Virginia Department of Health (VDH) also has a public health ho- tline at 877-ASK-VDH3, available week- days from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. • Call 2-1-1 Virginia For updates related to coronavirus and the impact on our community, visit www.radfordva.gov. Jenni Wilder City of Radford Heather Bell hbell@ourvalley.org See VSBA , page 2 RADFORD UNIVERSITY PHOTO Professor Alan Forrest’s weekly mindfulness emails have been uplifting the Radford family during these uncertain times. Alan Forrest, a mindful professor, brings words of encouragement to Radford community Working from his home office, an adjust- ment many across the world are making amid the coronavirus pandem- ic, Radford University Professor Alan Forrest, Ed.D. is uplifting the campus community with a series of inspirational messages. Forrest, a professor in the Department of Counselor Education since 1992, leads an on- campus mindfulness group, called “Mindful- ness Mondays.” Since its establishment, every Monday at noon, fac- ulty, staff and students meet in Peters Hall for 30 minutes of meditation practice. See Alan Forrest , page 2

RkJQdWJsaXNoZXIy ODMyMTA=